Related News for Mishac K. Yegian

The Way the Gingerbread Crumbles

ASCE students watched as CEE Professor Mishac Yegian put their gingerbread houses on the earthquake simulator during the annual Struc­turally Stable Gin­ger­bread House Com­pe­ti­tion.

Field Application of IPS for Liquefaction Mitigation

CEE Professors Mishac Yegian and Akram Alshawabkeh were awarded a $342K NSF grant for "Field Application of Induced Partial Saturation (IPS) for Liquefaction Mitigation".

Induced Partial Saturation Being Field Tested

CEE Professors Mishac Yegian and Akram Alshawabkeh were featured in ASCE Civil Engineering magazine for their upcoming field tests using Induced Partial Saturation (IPS) to prevent soil liquefaction during earthquakes.

Preventing Ground Failure Due to Earthquakes

CEE Professors Mishac Yegian and Akram Alshawabkeh were awarded a $1.2M NSF grant to use Induced Partial Saturation (IPS) to try and prevent ground liquefaction from occurring under structures during earthquakes.

Six Faculty Named 2010 Outstanding Teachers of the College of Engineering

Congratulations to the following faculty, who were identified by our students as Outstanding Teachers of the College of Engineering for 2010: Dionisio Bernal, Daniel Dulaski, Philip Larese-Casanova, Thomas Sheahan, Ming Wang, and Mishac Yegian.

Professor Yegian Protects Artwork

Prof. Mishac Yegian of Northeastern University in collaboration with Museum of Fine Arts, Boston has conducted research on evaluation of a mechanical isolator to protect four MFA sculptures against earthquakes in Nagoya Japan, where they will be displayed for four years.

Historical Brooklyn Bridge Built to Last

Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Mishac Yegian has determined that the Brooklyn Bridge could withstand an earthquake that registers a 6.5 on the Richter Scale without any damage to its foundation.

Prof Yegian's research on the Cover of Civil Engineering Magazine

Prof. Mishac Yegian's modeling of the Brooklyn Bridge evaluates its ability to withstand a 2,500-year seismic event.